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Nixtamal Para Pozole: Pozole Corn by Karen Hursh Graber © 2005

Preparing dried corn for pozole is not difficult, and follows the same basic process as preparing corn for masa - tortilla dough, although for the latter the corn is soaked much longer. If the dried corn called cacahuazintle in Mexico and "pozole corn" in English is not available in your area, it can be ordered online, along with cal (calcium hydroxide) at http://www.goumetsleuth.com

Ingredients:

  • 2 pounds dried field corn (flint corn, called cacahuazintle or maiz para pozole)
  • 4 tablespoons cal (builders' lime, calcium hydroxide)
  • 4 quarts water

Preparation:

Place the corn in a large stockpot over high heat with the cal and the water. Stir to dissolve the cal completely, bring to a boil and lower the heat to medium.

Continue simmering over medium heat until the skins of the kernels come off easily. This should take about 40-50 minutes. Check by taking a few out of the pot, letting them cool, and rubbing them between your fingers.

When the skins have loosened, drain the corn in a colander and rinse it very thoroughly several times to remove any residue from the cal. The kernels should be very white if all the cal has been properly rinsed. Rub the kernels between your fingers to remove all the outer skin. The small brown "eye," called the pedicel, at the base of each kernel can be removed with the thumbnail or small scissors. This is not necessary, but looks nicer and allows the corn to open up, or "flower," while the pozole cooks.

The corn is now ready to use in any pozole recipe.


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Published or Updated on: January 1, 2005 by Karen Hursh Graber © 2008
Contact Karen Hursh Graber

Follow Karen as she travels through the Central Mexican state of Puebla, meeting local cooks, tasting the food, and collecting recipes. With over 75 recipes, plus sections on ingredients and cooking techniques, the book takes the reader on a journey through one of Mexico's oldest and most renowned culinary regions. It can be ordered online.

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